Daughtry rocks MoMath with new songs, tales of fame

Chris Daughtry performed an acoustic set Nov. 21 at the National Museum of Math in New York City. (Photo courtesy of RCA Records.)

Chris Daughtry performed an acoustic set Nov. 21 at the National Museum of Math in New York City. (Photo courtesy of RCA Records.)

Like most people, I first watched Chris Daughtry on season 5 of American Idol. It’s clear how much he has changed since finishing in fourth place on the show.

Last night I watched the Grammy-nominated artist perform an acoustic set at the National Museum of Math (called MoMath) in New York City for a small group of mothers and children.

Not only was Daughtry very down to earth, he was also mind-bogglingly talented.

He entered the room with a warm, “Hey, hey, hey! How you doin’?”

The room embraced his personality and performance, which was flawless from the first note to the last. He combined his rasp with spot on pitch and a remarkable range in his set, which included his hit “Life After You” and two songs from his just-released album Baptized.

He was engaging and constantly kept the crowd smiling, while also staying true to himself and his edgy brand. The only time his voice cracked was while he was speaking. He reacted with a witty, “Sorry guys, I just went through puberty.”

During a question-and-answer session, he was asked about his start on Idol.

Daughtry released its fourth album, Baptized, this week. (Photo courtesy of RCA Records)

Daughtry released its fourth album, Baptized, this week. (Photo courtesy of RCA Records)

“If I never went on that show,” Daughtry said, “we wouldn’t be here right now.”

Using phrases like “the bees knees” and referring to himself as “Vin Diesel with a beard,” every word from his mouth was impulsive, honest, and adorable. When I asked him what he learned about himself by experiencing fame, he responded, “That I can be a giant d-bag.”

To which he quickly told the children, “That means dirtbag.”

Daughtry also shared the story of his start as a musician. His guitarist told part of the tale, explaining that they met in the music store in their hometown of Charlottesville Virginia, where Chris “played the instruments for free.”

For his earliest shows (pre-Idol, of course) he filled up the first two rows – “maybe” – and they were all people he knew and invited.

Not anymore.

“Everybody’s path is different, everyone has their own way and their own destiny,” Daughtry said. “And what worked for me may not work for the next person…I worked my butt off to get here.”

Juliet Shatkin, LSY college reporter (NYU)

Comments

  1. Alane Leibner says:

    Chris’s personality is a big reason his fans are absolutely true to him. He, and the other band members, are never afraid to show the world that they are all, indeed, just one of us. I have been very lucky to have met them a number of times… absolutely no pretention, sincere appreciation for you, and lots of patience. Besides being filled with incredible music, Daughtry concerts are full of fun, and a deep sense of togetherness that keeps all of us coming back time after time.

  2. Great article, you will never meet nicer people that Chris and the Daughtry band. They are truly all very, nice down to earth guys. I am thrilled with their success and their music.

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